Archive for the ‘physician’ Category

Renowned researcher to lead transformative institute

June 25, 2010

A new initiative in translational research at Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine and University Hospitals promises to catalyze scientific discoveries, formulate new therapies and inspire the next generation of physician-scientists.

Leading the effort will be one of the school’s newest additions: Jonathan S. Stamler, MD, who will serve as founding director of the Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine. Dr. Stamler is also the first to hold the Robert S. and Sylvia K. Reitman Family Foundation Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Innovation at the Case Cardiovascular Center and University Hospitals Harrington-McLaughlin Heart & Vascular Institute.

“This newly established chair in cardiovascular investigation and its relationship to the Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine will accelerate our scientific research to its full potential and provide new cures and therapies for the patients we serve,” says Richard A. Walsh, MD, physician-in-chief at University Hospitals and the John H. Hord Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University.


Dr Neal Meropol, Dr Robert Salata and Don Dumford fellow presenter

June 4, 2010

Dr Neal Meropol, Dr Robert Salata and Don Dumford fellow presenter

Originally uploaded by CWRUmedicine

Congratulations to everyone who participated in the Department of Medicine 2010 Research Day. The event had a tremendous turnout of faculty and young investigators. We are very proud of the research you are producing.

Check out the pictures from this CWRUmedicine event …

Good Morning America visits new heart imaging device in Cleveland

May 27, 2010

Dr. Marco Costa found a second blocked artery in Mack Bailey’s heart — and demonstrated to a Good Morning America audience the first vascular-imaging technology based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) — at the same time Thursday.

Costa is an interventional cardiologist and director of the cardiovascular research institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Bailey is a 60-year-old Clevelander with had a heart attack and is being treated by Costa.

Both agreed to be filmed and interviewed by the NBC morning news show because University Hospitals is the first — and so far only — hospital to use the C7-XR Imaging System and accompanying C7 Dragonfly Imaging Catheter made by LightLab Imaging Inc. during patient heart procedures.

While using the technology to place a stent in one of Bailey’s heart arteries, Costa found a second blocked artery that had not shown up on images of Bailey’s heart. Costa ended up placing two stents, that day.

“If he had gone home this weekend without having this procedure today, he would have gone home with a very nice, well-placed stent in the vessel that did not cause the heart attack,” Costa said during the Good Morning America segment.

The LightLab system uses near-infrared light to produce high-resolution, real-time images that are better and faster than images produced by competing ultrasound technology. The system recently was approved for sale by the Food and Drug Administration. UH Case Medical Center was the core laboratory on the FDA approval study and analyzed the study’s results, according to the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine blog.

Impotence plus heart disease ups death risk – Dr. Sahil Parikh discusses the study

May 27, 2010

Reuters Report ::

Men with heart disease who also have erectile dysfunction die sooner than men who do not seek treatment for impotence, researchers reported on Monday.

They found that men who had both conditions were twice as likely to die from any cause and twice as likely to have a heart attack than men with heart disease alone.

The researchers expressed concern that using drugs such as Pfizer’s Viagra or Eli Lilly’s Cialis to treat erectile dysfunction could mask the symptoms that point to widespread heart and artery disease and said men complaining of impotence should be checked by a cardiologist.

“Erectile dysfunction is something that regularly should be addressed in the medical history of patients; it might be a symptom of early atherosclerosis,” Dr. Michael Bohm of the University of Saarland in Germany, who led the study, said in a statement.

His team studied 1,519 men in 13 countries taking part in some larger studies of various heart disease treatments. As part of the study the men were also asked about erectile dysfunction.

More than half of them, 55 percent, did, Bohm’s team said in a report published in the journal Circulation and also presented at a meeting of the American College of Cardiology.

During the two years of the study, 11.3 percent of the patients who reported erectile dysfunction died, compared to 5.6 percent of those with mild or no impotence problems.

“It has long been known that erectile dysfunction is a marker for cardiovascular disease,” said Dr. Sahil Parikh at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, who was not involved in the study.

The first impotence drug, Pfizer’s Viagra, known generically as sildenafil, was at first developed to lower blood pressure, he said.

“They realized it had this other effect, which patients quite enjoyed,” Parikh said in a telephone interview.


Viagra and rival drugs such as Eli Lilly’s Cialis and Bayer AG’s BAYG.DE Levitra all work by increasing blood flow.

“In order to have proper erectile function, you have to have adequate blood flow to the genitals. If you have atherosclerosis, whether in the arteries on the neck, which can cause stroke, or the arteries of the heart, which can cause heart attack … it is the same disease.”

But while the erectile dysfunction drugs help blood flow all over the body, they do not treat the underlying hardening and narrowing in the arteries that is causing the problem.

“If patients have erectile dysfunction, we have to be very aggressive about screening and treating them for heart disease,” Parikh said.

When Viagra came onto the market, many health experts welcomed it as a way to get men who might otherwise neglect their health to go to a doctor. But Bohm and Parikh both agreed that patients — and their doctors — need to look hard at the hearts of men with erectile dysfunction.

“Men with ED going to a general practitioner or a urologist need to be referred for a cardiology workup to determine existing cardiovascular disease and proper treatment,” Bohm said.

“The medication works and the patient doesn’t show up any more,” he added. “These men are being treated for the ED, but not the underlying cardiovascular disease.”

The drugs are wildly popular. Viagra alone had sales of nearly $2 billion in 2009.

Donald Hricik discusses new hypertension study published in the Journal of American Medical Association

May 27, 2010

Half of Americans are in control of their blood pressure. But the number of new cases has gone up according to a new study out published in the Journal of American Medical Association which finds that one out of every three people had their hypertension under control 20 years ago compared to 50% of patients now. However, the number of people diagnosed with the condition has continued to go up.

Dr. Donald Hricik of CWRUmedicine Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at University Hospitals Case Medical Center is interviewed for the story. Watch the video.

2010 Health Care Hero, Dr Joseph Baar, presented by Crain’s Cleveland Businesss

May 25, 2010

Congratulations on Joseph Baar on selection as a 2010 Health Care Hero presented by Crain’s Cleveland Business. We are pleased to recognize him as a Winner in the category of Advancements in Health Care.

The nomination submitted on Dr Baar’s behalf is a testament to the impact he has had on patients, colleagues and Northeast Ohio’s medical community.

Again, congratulations to Joseph Baar on his selection for this very special honor. As one of Northeast Ohio’s Health Care Heroes, he plays a vital role in the quality of our everyday lives and the economic future of the region.

Dr Sarah Augustine honoured with Clinical Gender Equity Award

May 20, 2010

Dr. Sarah Augustine was honoured with the American Medical Women’s Association Clinical Gender Equity Award.

This award is supported by the Women Faculty of the School of Medicine but decided upon by the senior year medical student body to honour a faculty member who the students feel exemplify the principle of gender equality in their teaching and who promote a gender-fair environment for education and training of physicians.

Learn more at

CWRUmedicine’s Dr Marco Costa feature on ABC’s Good Morning America

May 20, 2010

Marco Costa, MD, PhD, Medical Director, Cath Lab, Director, Center for Research & Innovation, will be featured in an exclusive segment tomorrow on ABC’s Good Morning America between 7:30 and 8 am.

Dr. Costa was filmed in the Stereotaxis Lab in Lerner Tower conducting the United States’ first ever Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) procedure using the newly FDA approved C7-XR Imaging System made by LightLab. A pair of Dr. Costa’s patients will be featured in the story highlighting the speed, accuracy and new imaging technology that provides doctors faster operating times and improved accuracy.

This breakthrough intravascular imaging technology allows the clinician to readily see and measure important vessel characteristics otherwise invisible or difficult to observe with older intracoronary imaging modalities. UH Case Medical Center served as the core lab in the study prior to its FDA approval and was responsible for analyzing the study results. To date, UH Case Medical Center is the only hospital in the country where this procedure is available for patients.

Appointment of Neal J. Meropol, MD as the Chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology

April 16, 2010

April 16, 2010 Case Medical Center

It is my pleasure to announce the appointment of Neal J. Meropol, MD as the Chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology in the Department of Medicine at University Hospitals and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Dr. Meropol was recruited 8 months ago as the Lester E. Coleman, Jr. Professor of Cancer Research and Therapeutics and Section Chief of Medical Oncology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University and as Associate Director for Clinical Research in the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. During this period, Dr. Meropol has demonstrated remarkable leadership and administrative abilities in the Division and the Cancer Center.

Neal obtained his undergraduate degree at Princeton University and his MD degree at Vanderbilt University. He undertook his housestaff training in Internal Medicine here at University Hospitals Case Medical Center. His fellowship in Hematology and Medical Oncology occurred at the University of Pennsylvania. He has been a member of the faculty and staff at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Fox Chase Cancer Center before his recruitment to our medical center.

Dr. Meropol’s NIH-funded research program focuses on Medical Oncology clinical trials and outcomes. He has numerous national leadership roles in the American Society of Clinical Oncology and serves or has served on all major editorial boards of the leading journals in the specialty of Oncology. He has authored nearly 200 manuscripts and book chapters related to cancer prevention and treatment.

We look forward to Neal’s leadership of the Division of Hematology/Oncology during a very important period of growth for the Division and the Cancer Center.

Richard A. Walsh, M.D.
John H. Hord Professor and Chairman
Department of Medicine

Posted via email from CWRUmedicine’s blog

Happy Doctors Day!

March 31, 2010

The Department of Medicine would like to wish all physicians and future physicians a very Happy Doctors’ Day!

Each year, March 30th is designated as National Doctors’ Day.  The holiday, while not officially signed into law until the early 1990s, originated in the 1930s by a physician’s wife in North Georgia.

The Department of Medicine at Case Western Reserve Univeristy and University Hospitals Case Medical Center are proud to recognize Doctors Day. As physicians, you sacrifice so much of your life for all the additional years of school and training, plus being on call and taking time away from your families to care for those in need.  Many people don’t realize the level of pressure and stress that physicians deal with, how much debt many of you take on to become a doctor (the average is about $140,000, but many doctors have up to $250,000 in school debt), and the high cost of practicing medicine today.

Therefore, we would like to thank you for all your hard work, sacrifices, and care that you provide to so many people each and every day!  We hope you have a very enjoyable Doctors’ Day! You have more than earned it!