Posts Tagged ‘cardiovascular’

Ohio Third Frontier approves biomedical project, investing grants

May 27, 2010

The Ohio Third Frontier Commission on Wednesday approved $20 million in Wright Project grants, including nearly $9 million for three biomedical projects.

During their first meeting since voters approved an extension and expansion of the Ohio Third Frontier through fiscal 2015, commissioners also approved $11 million in entrepreneurial support and pre-seed investment fund grants, as well as a fiscal 2011 budget between $125 million and $143 million.

Third Frontier is the 10-year, $1.35 billion program to re-energize Ohio’s economy by investing in projects in five industry clusters, including biomedical. Early this month, voters added $700 million in bond proceeds and four years to the program.

The five commissioners who attended Wednesday’s meeting voted unanimously to fund seven Wright Project grant proposals, including:
Cleveland Clinic: $3 million for its Clinically Applied Rehabilitation Engineering project, which aims at developing, testing, manufacturing and commercializing advanced, rehabilitative medical products for patients suffering from cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, metabolic and musculoskeletal diseases. Collaborators: Parker Hannifin Corp., Bertec Corp., Case Western Reserve University and the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center.

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland: $2.1 million for its Development of a Quantitative Analysis System for Stem Cells project, which focuses on research commercialization of non-embryonic stem cells from umbilical cord blood as part of a Food and Drug Administration-licensed therapy to help some transplant patients and for testing. Collaborators: Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cleveland Cord Blood Center, BioInVision, Athersys (NASDAQ: ATHX), PerkinElmer, Thermogenesis (NASDAQ: KOOL), GE Healthcare (NYSE: GE), Hospira and Lakeland Community College.

University of Cincinnati: $3 million for its project, The Ohio Center for Microfluidic Innovation — New Products and Competitive Manufacturing of Emerging Biomedical Applications. The project wants to study, make and commercialize microfluidics technology, which could generate more valuable test results from a much smaller fluid sample than current technology. National Academies reviewers suggested the project be scaled back to just its biomedical applications. Collaborators: Siloam Biosciences, Gamma Dynamics, Sun Chemical and EnMonT.

Third Frontier advisers and commissioners spent a lot of time Wednesday debating “continuity” issues among entrepreneurial support and pre-seed investment funds that already have received grants. Facing state budget challenges, the program limited awards to only organizations that have received past money:

Cleveland Clinic was awarded $2 million for its Ohio BioValidation Fund III, which will invest in promising early stage biomedical companies.

JumpStart Inc., the venture development organization in Cleveland that has invested in several biomedical and healthcare companies, will receive $4 million for operations and investments. JumpStart gets an additional $1.8 million for its bioscience and entrepreneurial network, which will provide entrepreneurial services to bioscience start-ups in the Northeast Ohio region. Collaborators: BioEnterprise, Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise and the Akron Global Business Accelerator.

North Coast Angel Fund II in Mayfield Heights is getting $2 million to invest in high-potential, early stage technology companies.

Ohio TechAngel Fund III in Columbus was awarded $825,000 to invest in early stage Ohio-based technology companies, with a strong emphasis on healthcare innovations and information technology.

TechColumbus is getting $500,000 to continue investing in early-to-late-stage technologystart-ups in Central Ohio. Focus areas of the fund are bioscience, information technology and advanced materials.

Third Frontier commissioners put off votes on three more entrepreneurial support and pre-seed fund grant proposals, asking for more information with plans to vote on those proposals in June.

As for next year’s fiscal budget, the commissioners plan to award $20 million to entrepreneurial support and pre-seed funds, as well as $7 million to both biomedical and medical imaging grant-seekers. The commissioners also budgeted $8 million for a new Wright Center Success Fund, which will invest operating dollars in existing centers of innovation.

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Learn about the Clinical Role of Exercise Training in Management of Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

March 31, 2010

J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev. 2010 Mar

Prior exercise research and the recently completed HF-ACTION (Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training) trial indicate that regular exercise represents an effective therapy in the management of patients with stable chronic heart failure (HF) due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. This review summarizes the results from these studies and provides a guide for prescribing exercise. Regular aerobic-type exercise training improves exercise capacity; does not worsen and may, in fact, mildly improve cardiac function; and partially improves other physiological abnormalities that develop because of chronic HF (eg, autonomic and skeletal muscle function). Regular exercise is safe, improves health status, and modestly reduces ( approximately 15%) combined risk for cardiovascular death or HF-related hospitalization. Even greater physiological and clinical benefits appear likely in patients with HF who adhere to a higher volume of exercise (eg, 6 MET-hr per week). The exercise regimen should include an aerobic-type activity performed at least 30 minutes, 5 or more days per week, and at an intensity approximating 55% to 80% of heart rate reserve. Resistance training should be considered for patients who first demonstrate they are able to tolerate aerobic exercise training. Common to other interventions that also rely on human behavior, long-term adherence to exercise in patients with HF remains a challenge and requires additional research to determine strategies aimed at improving compliance. Areas of needed research include identifying which patient subgroup(s) benefits the most and determination of the optimal intensity, duration, and frequency of exercise needed to maximize clinical benefits and attenuate fatigue.

Read the full article on CWRUmedicine.org

Dr James Fang discusses the VAD Approach

March 24, 2010

An alternative one-on-one, patient-oriented approach to  heart disease and heart failure

According to James C. Fang, MD, Medical Director, Advanced Heart Failure & Transplant Center and Professor, Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine, “The mission of the Advanced Heart Failure & Transplant Center is to provide the latest and most effective therapies to patients in Northeast Ohio and surrounding regions in a personalized one-on-one, patient-centered approach.”

With a high level of expertise in treating heart failure, performing heart transplants, and implanting VADs (also known as heart pumps), the Center offers another sophisticated site in Ohio for patients to consider for their heart and vascular health. One of the most important services provided by the physicians at the Center is their ability to review a patient’s current medical and device therapies and then to provide other treatment options to improve their prognosis and quality of life. “At University Hospitals Case Medical Center, we offer many options and a very personalized approach. We are proud of the fact that we offer very individualized care,” says Dr. Fang. “Many patients don’t recognize that they are suffering needlessly.”

The VAD Option
Patients seen at the Center have refractory congestive heart failure and continue to be short of breath despite medications, device therapy (such as biventricular pacemakers) and heart surgery. These patients find that even doing simple activities like taking a shower or sitting in a chair are difficult. In addition, they cannot stay out of the hospital for very long – they are often regularly admitted for shortness of breath and fluid buildup in the legs. Such patients may be candidates for heart transplantation or a VAD.

VADs are sophisticated, miniaturized pumps that help the heart to provide sufficient blood flow throughout the patient’s body. “VADs are the newest form of a mechanical heart,” says Dr. Fang. A healthy heart can normally pump about 5 L of blood per minute around the body at rest. If, for example, a patient’s heart can pump only 1 L of blood per minute, the VAD will pump an additional 4 L, for a total of 5 L of blood per minute. “The heart pump helps,” notes Dr. Fang, “without entirely taking over the function of the heart.”

Typically, heart pumps are used temporarily while a patient awaits a heart transplant. Current first generation VADs, such as the Thoratec Heartmate XVE, are also used as a “destination” therapy – a permanent solution for heart failure. These devices can function for 12 to 18 months before they must be replaced. It is anticipated that a new, second generation of heart pumps, now undergoing investigational study, will increase the duration of ventricular assistance to two to four years. Nationwide about 2,500 heart transplant operations are performed annually and the Advanced Heart Failure & Transplant Center’s heart surgeons have collectively performed hundreds of heart transplants.

Learn more about VADs at CWRUmedicine.org

CWRUmedicine’s Dr Sahil Parikh advises Men seeking ED drugs for heart checkups also

March 16, 2010

Men with heart disease who also have erectile dysfunction die sooner than men who do not seek treatment for impotence, researchers reported.

They found that men who had both conditions were twice as likely to die from any cause and twice as likely to have a heart attack than men with heart disease alone.

The researchers expressed concern that using drugs such as Pfizer’s (PFE.N) Viagra or Eli Lilly’s (LLY.N) Cialis to treat erectile dysfunction could mask the symptoms that point to widespread heart and artery disease and said men complaining of impotence should be checked by a cardiologist.

“It has long been known that erectile dysfunction is a marker for cardiovascular disease,” said Dr. Sahil Parikh at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

The first impotence drug, Pfizer’s Viagra, known generically as sildenafil, was at first developed to lower blood pressure, he said.

“They realized it had this other effect, which patients quite enjoyed,” Parikh said in a telephone interview.

HAPPY SIDE-EFFECT

Viagra and rival drugs such as Eli Lilly’s Cialis and Bayer AG’s BAYG.DE Levitra all work by increasing blood flow.

“In order to have proper erectile function, you have to have adequate blood flow to the genitals. If you have atherosclerosis, whether in the arteries on the neck, which can cause stroke, or the arteries of the heart, which can cause heart attack … it is the same disease.”

But while the erectile dysfunction drugs help blood flow all over the body, they do not treat the underlying hardening and narrowing in the arteries that is causing the problem.

“If patients have erectile dysfunction, we have to be very aggressive about screening and treating them for heart disease,” Parikh said.

To learn more visit CWRUmedicine.org

Coffee good for your heart? MSNBC talk to CWRUmedicine’s Dr. Sahil Parikh

March 8, 2010
Download now or watch on posterous

MSNBC Coffee.flv (10219 KB)

A new study says coffee helps prevent irregular heartbeat. MSNBC’s Alex Witt talks with cardiologist Dr. Sahil Parikh.
Watch the video at CWRUmedicine.org

Today show “Inside the O.R.” with Dr Mauricio Arruda

March 1, 2010

Today goes “Inside the O.R.” Dr. Nancy Snyderman will give exclusive access to life-changing procedures live as they happen. She’s at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, where a heart surgery is under way with Dr. Mauricio Arruda.

Watch the video on CWRUmedicine.org

CWRUmedicine To Lead Hypertension Study

February 26, 2010

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is getting nearly 15 million dollars from the National Institutes of health to lead an important new study of hypertension.

Current guidelines recommend lowering hypertensive patients’ systolic blood pressure – that’s the first number in a blood pressure reading – to below 140 – 138 over 90, for example.  But physicians want to know if lowering that recommended systolic blood pressure to below 120 can further reduce the incidence of cardiovascular and kidney disease, or slow the decline of functional cognition.

Dr. Jackson Wright, who heads the Clinical Hypertension Program at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, says the medical school will be one of five U.S. institutions taking a leadership role in what’s called the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial – dubbed SPRINT.

Wright:  “The fact that Cleveland, Northeast Ohio and Central Ohio has a very diverse population makes this an outstanding location to conduct a study such as SPRINT.”

The study will take place over 9 years, and will involve 75 hundred patients.

Wright says it will measure the benefits of reducing systolic blood pressure against risks posed by increased medication and other factors in treatment of hypertension.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Download now or listen on posterous

1030hypertension.mp3 (396 KB)