Posts Tagged ‘cas’

CWRUmedicine and UH develops New Drugs to improve oxygen delivery to tissues

April 8, 2010

Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals are pleased to announce the awarding of a $4.7 million contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to Dr. Jonathan Stamler, Director of the Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine (ITMM).

The grant will fund development of a new class of drugs that selectively vasodilate under hypoxia and thereby enhance performance at high altitude (e.g. soldiers on mountains in Afganistan).

It is also anticipated that the grant will generate new physiologic information on high-altitude adaptation and new therapeutic interventions to treat patients suffering from conditions where oxygen delivery is impaired, including heart failure, ischemic heart disease, stroke, sickle cell disease and diabetes.

Studies will involve a transdisciplinary approach, including the Department of Anesthesia (James Reynolds) the division of Pulmonary Medicine (Kingman Stroh), and the Harrington-McLaughlin Cardiovascular Institute (Sahil Parikh).

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

New Research Published on Antibiotic resistance determinants in Acinetobacter spp

March 31, 2010

We explored the association of antibiotic-resistant phenotypes and genotypes in Acinetobacter spp with clinical outcomes and characteristics in 75 patients from a major military treatment facility. Amikacin resistance was associated with nosocomial acquisition of A baumannii, and carbapenem resistance and bla(OXA-23) were associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. The presence of bla(OXA-23) also correlated with longer hospital and ICU stay. Associations between bla(OXA-23) and complexity, duration, and changes made to antibiotic regimens also existed. Copyright 2010.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Read why Cushing’s syndrome: Why is diagnosis so difficult?

March 31, 2010

Practicing and perfecting the art of medicine demands recognition that uncertainty permeates all clinical decisions. When delivering clinical care, clinicians face a multiplicity of potential diagnoses, limitations in diagnostic capacity, and “sub-clinical” disease identified by tests rather than by clinical manifestations. In addition, clinicians must recognize the rapid changes in scientific knowledge needed to guide decisions. Cushing’s syndrome is one of several disorders in which there may be considerable difficulty and delay in diagnosis. This article describes a current model of clinical reasoning, some of its challenges, and the application of the principles of clinical epidemiology to meet some of those challenges.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Read about “Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the elderly”

March 30, 2010

The expansion of older population segments and the continuous increase in the incidence of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) makes this group of neoplasms an important and growing problem. Older NHL patients have increased risk of therapy-related toxicity as a result of age-related physiological changes and frequent co-morbidities. A functional assessment of the elderly patient is necessary to determine the likelihood of tolerating and responding to therapy. The comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is one multidisciplinary tool that has been applied successfully to older cancer patients and aids in identification of subjects who will or will not benefit from anti-neoplastic treatment. Although indolent lymphomas present more frequently at advanced stage, randomized trials do not show better outcomes with early therapy, supporting close observation until specific therapeutic indications arise. Use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy improves survival and has become the standard of care in first-line treatment. Radioimmunoconjugates, bendamustine, and other monoclonal antibodies as well as novel targeted agents also are active against indolent lymphomas. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is an aggressive but potentially curable disease. Several trials performed exclusively in elderly patients have demonstrated improved response rates and survival with the addition of rituximab to CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin [adriamycin], vincristine, prednisone) chemotherapy in the front-line setting. Salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic cell transplant (autoHCT) has been shown to have better failure-free and overall survival in randomized trials involving younger patients. Highly selected individuals up to age 70 years may attain long-term survival benefit from autoHCT, although transplant-related mortality is higher than in younger patients.

Read the full article on CWRUmedicine.org