Posts Tagged ‘case medical center’

University Hospitals Case Medical Center Remains Among the Elite in U.S. News & World Report Annual Survey

July 16, 2010

University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UHCMC) has again ranked among the elite in the latest U.S. News & World Report hospital rankings.  In this year’s survey, UHCMC ranked seven clinical specialties in the top 50 for hospitals and health systems nationwide.

Top among clinical departments at UHCMC, the Department of Medicine again contributed four of the specialties – Gastroenterology (28), Geriatrics (28), Cancer (34), and Pulmonology (42). This contribution by the Department of Medicine figured significantly into UHCMC joining only 152 other hospitals, or the top 3% of the nation’s 5,000 eligible healthcare organizations.

“This consistent level of excellence in compassionate, cost-effective patient care is a testament to the quality and dedication of the full time faculty in the Department of Medicine and to the leadership of our organizations.”

Richard A. Walsh, MD, Chairman, Department of Medicine

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UH received Top Health System Award

June 24, 2010

University Hospitals named one of the Top 10 Health Systems in U.S.

For the second consecutive year, University Hospitals (UH) has been named one of the top 10 health systems in the United States based on clinical performance by Thomson Reuters, a leading business and professional information organization.

UH and the other top 10 systems outperformed their peers by a wide margin. They provided better care, followed standards of care more closely, saved more lives, had fewer patient complications, and made fewer patient safety errors.

The list was compiled in a study conducted by researchers from the Thomson Reuters 100 Top Hospitals®. They analyzed the quality and efficiency of 255 health systems based on eight metrics that gauge clinical quality and efficiency: mortality, medical complications, patient safety, average length of stay, 30-day mortality rate, 30-day readmission rate, adherence to clinical standards of care (evidence-based core measures published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services), and HCAHPS patient survey score (part of a national initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to measure the quality of care in hospitals).

Thomson Reuters rankings are available at www.thomsonreuters.com.

University Hospitals Case Medical Center Earns Prestigious National Award for Excellence in Delivering High-Quality Care

June 3, 2010

University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center is one of five academic medical centers in the nation to receive the 2009 Quality Leadership Award from the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC). The prestigious award is given to teaching hospitals that demonstrate excellence in delivering high-quality care, as measured by the UHC Quality and Accountability Study conducted annually since 2005.

This year, 93 member hospitals were ranked by UHC, a national organization representing more than 90 percent of the nation’s nonprofit academic medical centers. UHC’s distinctive study measured hospitals’ performance using the Institute of Medicine’s six domains of care—safety, timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency, equity, and patient centeredness.

“We are proud of this extraordinary achievement which reflects University Hospitals’ ongoing commitment to quality and safety for our patients,” said Fred C. Rothstein, M.D., President of UH Case Medical Center. “This is an exceptional recognition when you consider that academic medical centers across the country participated in the survey.   We are pleased that the excellence of our health care providers and staff was recognized by this prestigious organization of peer institutions.”

“National recognition is well deserved for these organizations that have distinguished themselves as high-performing organizations in a complex environment. I salute the top performers and extend congratulations to all academic medical center leaders and employees who daily demonstrate a passion for improving patient care and operational effectiveness,” said UHC President and Chief Executive Officer Irene M. Thompson.

UHC examined data provided by member hospitals through its comparative clinical, operational, and core measures data bases and reviewed additional source data from the publicly reported Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey.

Other hospitals recognized this year in addition to UH Case Medical Center:

  • Methodist Hospital—A Clarian Health Partner, Indianapolis
  • Rush University Medical Center, Chicago
  • University Medical Center, Tucson
  • The University of Kansas Hospital Authority, Kansas City

“As an organization, UHC is committed to improving members’ performance. Through this study, we are able to determine what structures and practices are associated with excellent performance across an AMC,” said Mark Keroack, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Officer and Vice President of the UHC Clinical Practice Advancement Center. Dr. Keroack, with others at UHC, developed the study approach and has conducted several organizational development workshops for UHC members across the country.

He is the lead author of “Organizational Factors Associated With High Performance in Quality and Safety in Academic Medical Centers,” published in the December 2007 issue of Academic Medicine. The critical success factors first identified in that study are a shared sense of purpose throughout the organization, leadership style, an accountability system, a focus on results, and a collaborative culture.

Donald Hricik discusses new hypertension study published in the Journal of American Medical Association

May 27, 2010

Half of Americans are in control of their blood pressure. But the number of new cases has gone up according to a new study out published in the Journal of American Medical Association which finds that one out of every three people had their hypertension under control 20 years ago compared to 50% of patients now. However, the number of people diagnosed with the condition has continued to go up.

Dr. Donald Hricik of CWRUmedicine Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at University Hospitals Case Medical Center is interviewed for the story. Watch the video.

Katie Couric Tours Case Western Reserve Research Lab

May 19, 2010

Katie Couric visited Sanford “Sandy” Markowitz, MD, PhD, professor and researcher of cancer and genetics, and his research team in his lab to gain a better understanding of the day-to-day research necessary for advancements in colon cancer.

The CBS Evening News with Katie Couric anchor and managing editor received a warm welcome from the researchers, who provided Couric with hands-on training. They also informed her of the various research projects being conducted in the Markowitz lab at Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine.

The touching visit brought together Couric and Markowitz, who have been working together for years to improve colon cancer screening, and ultimately the disease. Couric’s late husband, Jay Monahan, succumbed to the disease in 1998.

Couric went on to help co-found The Entertainment Industry Foundation’s National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance, which has raised awareness and funding for colon cancer research.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Should patients have access to their records?

April 19, 2010

CWRUmedicine Poll

In the growing world of modern medicine and PHR technology should patients have access to their medical records or is too much information for people to handle? Should physicians be involved in the process to ensure accurate analysis and handle emotions?

Share your opinion and tell us what you think.

Take the poll

Uninsured heart attack victims delay ER trip :: Watch Dr James Fang as he discusses this issue with NBC

April 14, 2010

Uninsured heart attack victims delay ER trip

A new study of heart attack patients finds those without insurance or patients with very limited coverage are more likely to delay going to the emergency room when they’re having heart attack symptoms.

That’s a huge mistake, according to Arnold’s cardiologist, Dr. James Fang of University Hospitals Case Medical Center  in Cleveland.

“If you can get to somebody within what they call the golden hour, very first hour that this is occurring the chances of their long-term survival is very close to patients who never had a heart attack,” Fang said.

Watch the video :: http://bit.ly/amhEtS

James Fang discusses LVADs for End-Stage Heart Failure with WebMD

April 11, 2010

More than 5 million Americans have heart failure, a progressive and often lethal condition that weakens the heart and saps its pumping power. The mainstays of treatment — including drug therapy, lifestyle modification, and surgery to implant pacemakers or defibrillators — can be quite effective at managing symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure.

But what about the estimated 150,000 Americans who suffer from chronic, severe heart failure?

Doctors traditionally have had little to offer these patients in the way of lifesaving treatment, short of a heart transplant. But with only about 2,100 donor hearts available each year, the demand for hearts inevitably outweighs the supply. And some patients are simply too old to qualify for a transplant. For them, what’s the alternative?

There’s now an option that could change the outlook for many with severe heart failure: implantable mechanical pumps called left ventricular-assist devices (LVADs or sometimes simply VADs.)

These devices were once just used as a “bridge” — a temporary stopgap to keep heart failure patients alive until they could get a heart transplant. But now, they have become so effective that doctors use them as a treatment in themselves. LVADs are now an alternative to heart transplants, permanently augmenting the action of a heart’s main pumping chamber.

In addition, the continuous-flow LVAD was associated with fewer infections and a significantly lower rate of failure.

“The continuous-flow LVAD has changed the landscape of advanced heart failure,” says James C. Fang, MD, chief medical officer of the Harrington-McLaughlin Heart and Vascular Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland and the author of an editorial on LVADs that accompanied the study in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“In addition to being more durable, the new device is a lot smaller – about the size of a D battery. It’s also quiet. You can barely hear it. With the old devices, you could hear them coming down the street.”

Find the full article on CWRUmedicine.org

Susan Redline discusses Sleep Apnea Increases Stroke Risk with WebMD

April 9, 2010

Moderate to Severe Sleep Apnea Triples Stroke Risk in Men, Study Finds

WebMD | April 8, 2010

Obstructive sleep apnea more than doubles the risk of stroke in men and also increases the danger in women, new research indicates.

The finding comes from a major study of 5,422 people aged 40 and older who had no history of stroke. Researchers say increased risk of stroke appeared in men with mild sleep apnea and rose with severity.

Men with moderate to severe sleep apnea were about three times more likely to have a stroke than men with mild or no sleep apnea, researchers say.

The increased risk of stroke in women with obstructive sleep apnea was significant only in cases of severe apnea, according to the study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Stroke

Data were taken from the Sleep Heart Health Study, which is ongoing at a number of locations. The participants in the beginning performed a standard at-home sleep test to determine whether they had sleep apnea, and if so, its severity.

They were followed for about nine years, and during that time, 193 suffered strokes — 85 men out of 2,462 enrolled and 108 women out of 2,960.

“Although more women had strokes, relatively more men with sleep apnea than without sleep apnea had strokes, and less so in women,” study author Susan Redline, MD, MPH, of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, tells WebMD in an email. “I think that the relatively greater impact of sleep apnea on risk of stroke in men relates to the likely longer duration of sleep apnea in men than women.”

Researchers say more than 15 million strokes occur worldwide every year, and that about a third are fatal. Increased risk of stroke in people with sleep apnea exists even without other risk factors, such as weight, high blood pressure, race, diabetes, and smoking.

Men may be more at risk because they develop sleep apnea at younger ages, the researchers say, and thus go untreated for longer periods.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org