Posts Tagged ‘cwrumedicine awards’

CWRU Ranked in the Nation’s Top 20 Medical Schools by U.S.News & World Report

April 15, 2010

Case Western Reserve’s School of Medicine ranked 20th in research by US News and World Report. Congratulations to all CWRUmedicine faculty and staff who contributed to this recognition.

Case Western Reserve University once again ranked as one of the best medical schools in the nation in the annual U.S. News & World Report “America’s Best Graduate Schools” rankings. Of the 146 national programs surveyed by the magazine, Case Western Reserve’s School of Medicine ranked 20th in research—and overall, an improvement of five places over last year’s ranking. This ranking once again placed it highest among Ohio medical schools.

“This ranking reflects the extraordinary efforts of our faculty to continue to pursue medical breakthroughs, as well as the excellence of our student body,” said Pamela B. Davis, dean of the School of Medicine. “I congratulate everyone in our academic community on this well-deserved recognition.”

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

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Susan Redline discusses Sleep Apnea Increases Stroke Risk with WebMD

April 9, 2010

Moderate to Severe Sleep Apnea Triples Stroke Risk in Men, Study Finds

WebMD | April 8, 2010

Obstructive sleep apnea more than doubles the risk of stroke in men and also increases the danger in women, new research indicates.

The finding comes from a major study of 5,422 people aged 40 and older who had no history of stroke. Researchers say increased risk of stroke appeared in men with mild sleep apnea and rose with severity.

Men with moderate to severe sleep apnea were about three times more likely to have a stroke than men with mild or no sleep apnea, researchers say.

The increased risk of stroke in women with obstructive sleep apnea was significant only in cases of severe apnea, according to the study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Stroke

Data were taken from the Sleep Heart Health Study, which is ongoing at a number of locations. The participants in the beginning performed a standard at-home sleep test to determine whether they had sleep apnea, and if so, its severity.

They were followed for about nine years, and during that time, 193 suffered strokes — 85 men out of 2,462 enrolled and 108 women out of 2,960.

“Although more women had strokes, relatively more men with sleep apnea than without sleep apnea had strokes, and less so in women,” study author Susan Redline, MD, MPH, of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, tells WebMD in an email. “I think that the relatively greater impact of sleep apnea on risk of stroke in men relates to the likely longer duration of sleep apnea in men than women.”

Researchers say more than 15 million strokes occur worldwide every year, and that about a third are fatal. Increased risk of stroke in people with sleep apnea exists even without other risk factors, such as weight, high blood pressure, race, diabetes, and smoking.

Men may be more at risk because they develop sleep apnea at younger ages, the researchers say, and thus go untreated for longer periods.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

CWRUmedicine and UH develops New Drugs to improve oxygen delivery to tissues

April 8, 2010

Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals are pleased to announce the awarding of a $4.7 million contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to Dr. Jonathan Stamler, Director of the Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine (ITMM).

The grant will fund development of a new class of drugs that selectively vasodilate under hypoxia and thereby enhance performance at high altitude (e.g. soldiers on mountains in Afganistan).

It is also anticipated that the grant will generate new physiologic information on high-altitude adaptation and new therapeutic interventions to treat patients suffering from conditions where oxygen delivery is impaired, including heart failure, ischemic heart disease, stroke, sickle cell disease and diabetes.

Studies will involve a transdisciplinary approach, including the Department of Anesthesia (James Reynolds) the division of Pulmonary Medicine (Kingman Stroh), and the Harrington-McLaughlin Cardiovascular Institute (Sahil Parikh).

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Cleveland ranked 16 on Real Simple’s Top Time-Saving Cities in America List

April 7, 2010

The report, in the magazine’s April issue, highlighted urban areas across the nation that offer convenient, timesaving services to residents.

To learn more and review Clevelands scorecard visit us at CWRUmedicine.org

The Survey
Takeout on every corner. Easy access to a doctor. Timed traffic lights. These conveniences can ease even the most chaotic days. To assess which places help you make the most of your precious hours, we sorted through reams of data on dozens of large American cities, ranked each on various criteria in five categories (see below) on a scale of 1 to 5, and added up those categories to get an overall score.

Category 1 :: Getting Around
Includes average commute, walkability, traffic congestion, airport on-time performance.

Category 2 :: Health and Safety
Includes average wait to get a doctor’s appointment, physicians per capita, response times of emergency medical services.

Category 3 :: Information and Technology
Includes broadband and wireless availability, bookstores and libraries per capita, helpful resources such as 311 hotlines.

Category 4 :: Green Time-Savers
Includes recycling access and cost, number of farmers’ markets and community gardens, bike friendliness.

Category 5 :: Lifestyle
Includes number of personal trainers and organizers, restaurants offering takeout per capita, miscellaneous time-saving services.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

New Research Published on Antibiotic resistance determinants in Acinetobacter spp

March 31, 2010

We explored the association of antibiotic-resistant phenotypes and genotypes in Acinetobacter spp with clinical outcomes and characteristics in 75 patients from a major military treatment facility. Amikacin resistance was associated with nosocomial acquisition of A baumannii, and carbapenem resistance and bla(OXA-23) were associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. The presence of bla(OXA-23) also correlated with longer hospital and ICU stay. Associations between bla(OXA-23) and complexity, duration, and changes made to antibiotic regimens also existed. Copyright 2010.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Read why Cushing’s syndrome: Why is diagnosis so difficult?

March 31, 2010

Practicing and perfecting the art of medicine demands recognition that uncertainty permeates all clinical decisions. When delivering clinical care, clinicians face a multiplicity of potential diagnoses, limitations in diagnostic capacity, and “sub-clinical” disease identified by tests rather than by clinical manifestations. In addition, clinicians must recognize the rapid changes in scientific knowledge needed to guide decisions. Cushing’s syndrome is one of several disorders in which there may be considerable difficulty and delay in diagnosis. This article describes a current model of clinical reasoning, some of its challenges, and the application of the principles of clinical epidemiology to meet some of those challenges.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

New Research on Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in their first complete remission

March 31, 2010

“Effect of Age on Outcome of Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First Complete Remission or With Myelodysplastic Syndrome”

McClune BL, Weisdorf DJ, Pedersen TL, da Silva GT, Tallman MS, Sierra J, Dipersio J, Keating A, Gale RP, George B, Gupta V, Hahn T, Isola L, Jagasia M, Lazarus H, Marks D, Maziarz R, Waller EK, Bredeson C, Giralt S.
J Clin Oncol. 2010 Mar 8

PURPOSE:
Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) primarily afflict older individuals. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is generally not offered because of concerns of excess morbidity and mortality. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens allow increased use of allogeneic HCT for older patients. To define prognostic factors impacting long-term outcomes of RIC regimens in patients older than age 40 years with AML in first complete remission or MDS and to determine the impact of age, we analyzed data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR).

PATIENTS AND METHODS:
We reviewed data reported to the CIBMTR (1995 to 2005) on 1,080 patients undergoing RIC HCT. Outcomes analyzed included neutrophil recovery, incidence of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS).

RESULTS:
Univariate analyses demonstrated no age group differences in NRM, grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, or relapse. Patients age 40 to 54, 55 to 59, 60 to 64, and >/= 65 years had 2-year survival rates as follows: 44% (95% CI, 37% to 52%), 50% (95% CI, 41% to 59%), 34% (95% CI, 25% to 43%), and 36% (95% CI, 24% to 49%), respectively, for patients with AML (P = .06); and 42% (95% CI, 35% to 49%), 35% (95% CI, 27% to 43%), 45% (95% CI, 36% to 54%), and 38% (95% CI, 25% to 51%), respectively, for patients with MDS (P = .37). Multivariate analysis revealed no significant impact of age on NRM, relapse, DFS, or OS (all P > .3). Greater HLA disparity adversely affected 2-year NRM, DFS, and OS. Unfavorable cytogenetics adversely impacted relapse, DFS, and OS. Better pre-HCT performance status predicted improved 2-year OS. CONCLUSION: With these similar outcomes observed in older patients, we conclude that older age alone should not be considered a contraindication to HCT.

Read new research paper from CWRUmedicine Hematology Oncology on Human beta-defensin-2 expression

March 31, 2010

“Expression of human beta-defensin-2 in intratumoral vascular endothelium and in endothelial cells induced by transforming growth factor beta”
Peptides 2010 Feb
Kawsar HI, Ghosh SK, Hirsch SA, Koon HB, Weinberg A, Jin G.

Human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is a small cationic peptide originally identified from psoriatic skin lesions as an antimicrobial agent of the innate immune system. The expression of hBD-2 is believed to be induced exclusively in epithelial cells by microbial components and certain proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta). In this study, we report, for the first time, that hBD-2 is expressed in vascular endothelial cells associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Kaposi’s sarcoma lesions, but not in that of normal stroma. Expression of hBD-2 in vascular endothelial cells was further substantiated by in vitro experiments using cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF beta 1) and IL-1 beta, two well-known tumorigenic inflammatory mediators, induce hBD-2 transcript and peptide expression in HUVECs. However, TGF beta 1 does not stimulate hBD-2 expression in oral epithelial cells. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines and microbial reagents do not induce the expression of hBD-1 and hBD-3 in HUVECs. Since hBD-2 has been shown to modulate migration, proliferation, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro and participate in immune cell trafficking, its expression in vascular endothelial cells located within malignant lesions may play a role in tumor angiogenesis and cancer metastasis.

Read the full article on CWRUmedicine.org

Happy Doctors Day!

March 31, 2010

The Department of Medicine would like to wish all physicians and future physicians a very Happy Doctors’ Day!

Each year, March 30th is designated as National Doctors’ Day.  The holiday, while not officially signed into law until the early 1990s, originated in the 1930s by a physician’s wife in North Georgia.

The Department of Medicine at Case Western Reserve Univeristy and University Hospitals Case Medical Center are proud to recognize Doctors Day. As physicians, you sacrifice so much of your life for all the additional years of school and training, plus being on call and taking time away from your families to care for those in need.  Many people don’t realize the level of pressure and stress that physicians deal with, how much debt many of you take on to become a doctor (the average is about $140,000, but many doctors have up to $250,000 in school debt), and the high cost of practicing medicine today.

Therefore, we would like to thank you for all your hard work, sacrifices, and care that you provide to so many people each and every day!  We hope you have a very enjoyable Doctors’ Day! You have more than earned it!