Posts Tagged ‘CWRUmedicine SHARE’

gastroenterology publications :: Q2 | 2010

July 8, 2010

Tissue apposition system: new technology to minimize surgery for endoscopically unresectable colonic polyps
Delaney CP, Champagne BJ, Marks JM, Sanuk L, Ermlich B, Chak A.
Surg Endosc. 2010 May

Variability in measurements of pancreatic cyst size among EUS, CT, and magnetic resonance imaging modalities
Maimone S, Agrawal D, Pollack MJ, Wong RC, Willis J, Faulx AL, Isenberg GA, Chak A.
Gastrointest Endosc. 2010 May

Endoscopic mucosal resection with full-thickness closure for difficult polyps: a prospective clinical trial.
Agrawal D, Chak A, Champagne BJ, Marks JM, Delaney CP.
Gastrointest Endosc. 2010 May

The diagnostic efficacy of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: is there a role in the intensive care unit?
Trunzo JA, Poulose BK, McGee MF, Nikfarjam M, Schomisch SJ, Onders RP, Jin J, Chak A, Ponsky JL, Marks JM.
Surg Endosc. 2010 Mar

A segregation analysis of Barrett’s esophagus and associated adenocarcinomas
Sun X, Elston R, Barnholtz-Sloan J, Falk G, Grady WM, Kinnard M, Mittal SK, Willis JE, Markowitz S, Brock W, Chak A.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Mar

Primary malignant melanoma of the hepatic duct: a case report
Agrawal D, Tannous GC, Chak A.
Gastrointest Endosc. 2010 Jun

Transgastric natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery peritoneoscopy in humans: a pilot study in efficacy and gastrotomy site selection by using a hybrid technique
Nikfarjam M, McGee MF, Trunzo JA, Onders RP, Pearl JP, Poulose BK, Chak A, Ponsky JL, Marks JM.
Gastrointest Endosc. 2010 Jun

Testing the critical size in calvarial bone defects: revisiting the concept of a critical-size defect
Cooper GM, Mooney MP, Gosain AK, Campbell PG, Losee JE, Huard J.
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2010 Jun

Bypass versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg (BASIL) trial: A survival prediction model to facilitate clinical decision making
Bradbury AW, Adam DJ, Bell J, Forbes JF, Fowkes FG, Gillespie I, Ruckley CV, Raab GM; BASIL trial Participants.
J Vasc Surg. 2010 May

Bypass versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg (BASIL) trial: A description of the severity and extent of disease using the Bollinger angiogram scoring method and the TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus II classification
Bradbury AW, Adam DJ, Bell J, Forbes JF, Fowkes FG, Gillespie I, Ruckley CV, Raab GM; BASIL trial Participants.
J Vasc Surg. 2010 May

Bypass versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg (BASIL) trial: Analysis of amputation free and overall survival by treatment received.
Bradbury AW, Adam DJ, Bell J, Forbes JF, Fowkes FG, Gillespie I, Ruckley CV, Raab GM; BASIL trial Participants.
J Vasc Surg. 2010 May

Bypass versus Angioplasty in Severe Ischaemia of the Leg (BASIL) trial: An intention-to-treat analysis of amputation-free and overall survival in patients randomized to a bypass surgery-first or a balloon angioplasty-first revascularization strategy.
Bradbury AW, Adam DJ, Bell J, Forbes JF, Fowkes FG, Gillespie I, Ruckley CV, Raab GM; BASIL trial Participants.
J Vasc Surg. 2010 May

AHRQ series commentary 1: rating the evidence in comparative effectiveness reviews
Falck-Ytter Y, Schünemann H, Guyatt G.
J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 May

Feasibility of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of chronic radiation proctitis
Nikfarjam M, Faulx A, Laughinghouse M, Marks JM.
Surg Innov. 2010 Jun

Variability in measurements of pancreatic cyst size among EUS, CT, and magnetic resonance imaging modalities
Maimone S, Agrawal D, Pollack MJ, Wong RC, Willis J, Faulx AL, Isenberg GA, Chak A
Gastrointest Endosc. 2010 May

A segregation analysis of Barrett’s esophagus and associated adenocarcinomas
Sun X, Elston R, Barnholtz-Sloan J, Falk G, Grady WM, Kinnard M, Mittal SK, Willis JE, Markowitz S, Brock W, Chak A.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Mar

Elevated IL-13Ralpha2 in intestinal epithelial cells from ulcerative colitis or colorectal cancer initiates MAPK pathway
Mandal D, Levine AD.
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2010 May

Dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) is an ETS-regulated negative feedback mediator of oncogenic ERK signaling in lung cancer cells
Zhang Z, Kobayashi S, Borczuk AC, Leidner RS, Laframboise T, Levine AD, Halmos B.
Carcinogenesis. 2010 Apr

REDOX regulation of IL-13 signaling in intestinal epithelial cells: Usage of alternate pathways mediates distinct gene expression patterns
Mandal D, Fu P, Levine AD.
Cell Signal. 2010 Jun 

James Fang discusses LVADs for End-Stage Heart Failure with WebMD

April 11, 2010

More than 5 million Americans have heart failure, a progressive and often lethal condition that weakens the heart and saps its pumping power. The mainstays of treatment — including drug therapy, lifestyle modification, and surgery to implant pacemakers or defibrillators — can be quite effective at managing symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure.

But what about the estimated 150,000 Americans who suffer from chronic, severe heart failure?

Doctors traditionally have had little to offer these patients in the way of lifesaving treatment, short of a heart transplant. But with only about 2,100 donor hearts available each year, the demand for hearts inevitably outweighs the supply. And some patients are simply too old to qualify for a transplant. For them, what’s the alternative?

There’s now an option that could change the outlook for many with severe heart failure: implantable mechanical pumps called left ventricular-assist devices (LVADs or sometimes simply VADs.)

These devices were once just used as a “bridge” — a temporary stopgap to keep heart failure patients alive until they could get a heart transplant. But now, they have become so effective that doctors use them as a treatment in themselves. LVADs are now an alternative to heart transplants, permanently augmenting the action of a heart’s main pumping chamber.

In addition, the continuous-flow LVAD was associated with fewer infections and a significantly lower rate of failure.

“The continuous-flow LVAD has changed the landscape of advanced heart failure,” says James C. Fang, MD, chief medical officer of the Harrington-McLaughlin Heart and Vascular Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland and the author of an editorial on LVADs that accompanied the study in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“In addition to being more durable, the new device is a lot smaller – about the size of a D battery. It’s also quiet. You can barely hear it. With the old devices, you could hear them coming down the street.”

Find the full article on CWRUmedicine.org

Susan Redline discusses Sleep Apnea Increases Stroke Risk with WebMD

April 9, 2010

Moderate to Severe Sleep Apnea Triples Stroke Risk in Men, Study Finds

WebMD | April 8, 2010

Obstructive sleep apnea more than doubles the risk of stroke in men and also increases the danger in women, new research indicates.

The finding comes from a major study of 5,422 people aged 40 and older who had no history of stroke. Researchers say increased risk of stroke appeared in men with mild sleep apnea and rose with severity.

Men with moderate to severe sleep apnea were about three times more likely to have a stroke than men with mild or no sleep apnea, researchers say.

The increased risk of stroke in women with obstructive sleep apnea was significant only in cases of severe apnea, according to the study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Stroke

Data were taken from the Sleep Heart Health Study, which is ongoing at a number of locations. The participants in the beginning performed a standard at-home sleep test to determine whether they had sleep apnea, and if so, its severity.

They were followed for about nine years, and during that time, 193 suffered strokes — 85 men out of 2,462 enrolled and 108 women out of 2,960.

“Although more women had strokes, relatively more men with sleep apnea than without sleep apnea had strokes, and less so in women,” study author Susan Redline, MD, MPH, of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, tells WebMD in an email. “I think that the relatively greater impact of sleep apnea on risk of stroke in men relates to the likely longer duration of sleep apnea in men than women.”

Researchers say more than 15 million strokes occur worldwide every year, and that about a third are fatal. Increased risk of stroke in people with sleep apnea exists even without other risk factors, such as weight, high blood pressure, race, diabetes, and smoking.

Men may be more at risk because they develop sleep apnea at younger ages, the researchers say, and thus go untreated for longer periods.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

CWRUmedicine and UH develops New Drugs to improve oxygen delivery to tissues

April 8, 2010

Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals are pleased to announce the awarding of a $4.7 million contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to Dr. Jonathan Stamler, Director of the Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine (ITMM).

The grant will fund development of a new class of drugs that selectively vasodilate under hypoxia and thereby enhance performance at high altitude (e.g. soldiers on mountains in Afganistan).

It is also anticipated that the grant will generate new physiologic information on high-altitude adaptation and new therapeutic interventions to treat patients suffering from conditions where oxygen delivery is impaired, including heart failure, ischemic heart disease, stroke, sickle cell disease and diabetes.

Studies will involve a transdisciplinary approach, including the Department of Anesthesia (James Reynolds) the division of Pulmonary Medicine (Kingman Stroh), and the Harrington-McLaughlin Cardiovascular Institute (Sahil Parikh).

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

New Research from the Division of Infectious Disease on Beta-Lactamases

April 7, 2010

Penicillin sulfone inhibitors of class D beta-lactamases
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2010 Apr

Drawz SM, Bethel CR, Doppalapudi VR,Hujer AM, Skalweit MJ, Anderson VE, Chen SG, Buynak JD, Bonomo RA.
Departments of Pathology, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland

Mitochondrial dynamics in Alzheimer’s disease

April 7, 2010

“Mitochondrial dynamics in Alzheimer’s disease: opportunities for future treatment strategies”

Drugs Aging. 2010 Mar 1

Bonda DJ, Wang X, Perry G, Smith MA, Zhu X.
Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland

Read more at CWRUmedicine.org

Cleveland ranked 16 on Real Simple’s Top Time-Saving Cities in America List

April 7, 2010

The report, in the magazine’s April issue, highlighted urban areas across the nation that offer convenient, timesaving services to residents.

To learn more and review Clevelands scorecard visit us at CWRUmedicine.org

The Survey
Takeout on every corner. Easy access to a doctor. Timed traffic lights. These conveniences can ease even the most chaotic days. To assess which places help you make the most of your precious hours, we sorted through reams of data on dozens of large American cities, ranked each on various criteria in five categories (see below) on a scale of 1 to 5, and added up those categories to get an overall score.

Category 1 :: Getting Around
Includes average commute, walkability, traffic congestion, airport on-time performance.

Category 2 :: Health and Safety
Includes average wait to get a doctor’s appointment, physicians per capita, response times of emergency medical services.

Category 3 :: Information and Technology
Includes broadband and wireless availability, bookstores and libraries per capita, helpful resources such as 311 hotlines.

Category 4 :: Green Time-Savers
Includes recycling access and cost, number of farmers’ markets and community gardens, bike friendliness.

Category 5 :: Lifestyle
Includes number of personal trainers and organizers, restaurants offering takeout per capita, miscellaneous time-saving services.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org