Posts Tagged ‘dan simon’

The Prophetic Protein :: Who is at risk for heart attack?

June 25, 2010

Tense hours in the emergency room while tests confirm a heart attack may be rolled back to mere minutes, thanks to a telltale protein marker identified by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers. Better yet, a routine blood test for the nefarious protein could serve as an early warning to people at high risk :: Take steps now, and you may dodge the dangerous attack altogether.

When the proverbial elephant takes a seat on one’s chest, it is a decided hint: That person might be having a heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI). Every 25 seconds, someone in the United States has one, according to the American Heart Association, but the oft-reported sensation of chest tightening or pain is just that-a clue. Even in the hospital, it can take eight to 12 hours for current tests to conclusively rule a heart attack in or out. Common alternative culprits in chest pain are intense heartburn or a gallstone attack.

Led by top physician-researcher Daniel I. Simon, MD, investigators at the School of Medicine, however, have discovered a marker of heart attack that promises to cuthours off the time for definitive MI diagnosis-to the tune of confirmation within 10 to 15 minutes of arriving at the emergency room. What’s more, a simple blood test for the novel myeloid-related protein-8/14 (MRP-8/14) marker could give long-used cholesterol screening a run for its money as a signal of MI in the making, years ahead of the cardiac attack.

“Though we gain great insight into patients’ potential risk for cardiovascular disease using conventional biomarkers, we are limited in identifying some people at risk,” says Douglas Vaughan, MD, professor of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and chair of its Department of Medicine. “An additional marker measured in people’s blood could valuably refine our ability to take care of patients with coronary artery disease.”

To hone in on the up-and-coming predictive protein MRP- 8/14, researchers applied an unprecedented scientific approach that scoured entire human genomes for cardiac warning signs. “We were on the hunt. We wanted to know what genes turn on or off in heart attack patients,” explains Dr. Simon, the Herman K. Hellerstein Professor of Cardiovascular Research at the School of Medicine and director of University Hospitals Harrington-McLaughlin Heart & Vascular Institute. Dr. Simon and his team of researchers identified MRP-8/14 as their best-bet marker for heart attack for use in emergency settings and as a potential companion to routine cholesterol screening in the doctor’s office.

Dr. Simon’s account is a tale of finding a little molecule with big potential-a project born in a lab in New England that has grown on a campus in Cleveland.

Read the full story at Medicus.

Cardiologists discover cancer risks in group of blood pressure medications

June 24, 2010

University Hospitals Case Medical Center cardiologists have uncovered new research showing an increased risk of cancer with a group of blood pressure medications known as angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs).

This class of drugs is used by millions of patients not only for high blood pressure but also for heart failure, cardiovascular risk reduction and diabetic kidney disease.

University Hospitals Harrington-McLaughlin Heart & Vascular Institute’s Drs. Ilke Sipahi, Daniel I. Simon and James C. Fang recently completed a meta-analysis of over 60,000 patients randomly assigned to take either an ARB or a control medication. Their findings are published online today at The Lancet Oncology.

The researchers found that patients randomized to ARBs has “significantly increased risk of new cancer” compared to control patients.

“We have found the risk of new cancers was increased with these medications by 8-11 percent,” said Dr. Ilke Sipahi, associate director of heart failure and transplantation and assistant professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. “Most importantly, risk of lung cancer was increased by 25 percent.”

However, the research did not establish any link between ARBs and other types of cancer such breast cancer.

“This is the first time an association between ARBs and cancer development is suggested,” Dr. Sipahi continued. “While our findings are robust, they need to be replicated in other studies before they can be considered as definitive.”

Before this study, there were no major safety concerns with ARBs except for their use in pregnancy and in patients with chronic kidney or blockages of kidney arteries. Interestingly, previous animal studies with ARBs have been negative for cancer development.

“In medicine, physicians must balance the benefits and risks of all drug and device therapies,” said Dr. Daniel Simon, director of the Harrington-McLaughlin Heart & Vascular Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. “We recommend that patients discuss the findings of this study with their physicians since ARBs are effective agents in the treatment of high blood pressure and heart failure. Meta-analyses are a powerful tool to look at low frequency safety signals, but require confirmation with other approaches, such as large national health and managed care registries.”

CWRUmedicine Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

February 26, 2010

The Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, a premier center for comprehensive care of patients with diseases affecting the heart and vascular system, has a goal to create a national center of excellence in cardiovascular research and physician education, as well as patient care.
Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

Cardiovascular Medicine Research Innovation Video

February 24, 2010

CWRUmedicine’s Cardiovascular Medicine’s Research & Innovation Center is the largest biomedical research center in the state of Ohio, and one of the top 15 in the country.

Our Cardiovascular Research Center works specifically to improve the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We use translational research (the clinical application of scientific medical research from lab to bedside) and advancements in biomedicine to improve industry standards and quality of patient care.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine Cardiovascular Medicine