Posts Tagged ‘research’

MORE about our RESEARCH

April 26, 2010

MORE about our RESEARCH

The Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine has contributed several historical breakthroughs in the fields of medicine and health. Indeed, the CWRU School of Medicine boasts eight Nobel laureates among its faculty and alumni, including former professor of physiology John J.R. Macleod, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine in 1923 for the discovery of insulin, and alumnus Paul C. Lauterbur, B.S. Chemistry ’51, who shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine in 2003 with Sir Peter Mansfield for discoveries in magnetic resonance imaging. Other notable research accomplishments by School faculty are the first surgical treatments of coronary artery disease, the first simulated milk formula for infants, development of the first heart-lung machine for use in open heart surgeries, the first successful genetic alteration of human cells in a test tube and creation of the first artificial human chromosome.

Today, research being conducted by faculty and students at the Department of Medicine ranges from examining infectious diseases of the developing world to creating the first stool test that detects colon cancer, and much more. Of additional note, the School of Medicine was awarded $64 million from the National Science Foundation to form the Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative in partnership with three hospital affiliates.

The Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine is affiliated with some of the best hospitals in the United States and is committed to developing a research portfolio that is aligned with their strategic clinical initiatives. Department affiliates include University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, The MetroHealth System and Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Through these partnerships, several cutting-edge technologies and research facilities are available to faculty and students. Core facilities of the School are the Case Medical Center, which comprises Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Health System, the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, and the MetroHealth Medical System Rammelkamp Center for Education and Research. Additional prominent facilities include the Case Center for Imaging Research, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Center for Aids Research, National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center (the only one of its kind in the United States), Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics, and Center for Global Health and Disease.

To maintain such a high standard of biomedical research, the Department of Medicine continually looks to the future.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

CWRUmedicine Annual Research Day

April 13, 2010

CWRUmedicine Annual Research DayResearch Day provides an opportunity for researchers in training at the Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine to present their biomedical research in a public forum.

This group includes trainees at all levels of programming, including graduate, undergraduate, medical and MD/PhD students, as well as postdoctoral fellows and researchers and clinical residents and fellows.

Research Day also presents an opportunity for colleagues and visitors to learn about the cutting edge research occuring at Case Medical Center.

With multiple posters representing a wide array of research topics are displayed throughout the day, with presenters on hand to discuss their projects and research findings with visitors and guests.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

CWRUmedicine’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Research Update

March 23, 2010

Investigators, led by Fabio Cominelli, M.D., Ph.D., formed an integrated team to explore multiple aspects of intestinal inflammation utilizing clinical resources as well as animal models of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Some of the topics under investigation include intestinal cytokine regulation, immune-nonimmune cell interactions, extracellular matrix biology, tolerance to indigenous intestinal flora, and state-of-the-art gene expression profiling by DNA microaray technology. In collaboration with the Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, these investigators have been previously awarded by the National Institutes of Health a large five-year program project grant to study pediatric inflammatory bowel disease, the only such program in the country during that period. Basic research is complemented by a variety of clinical and translational studies. These include investigation of inflammatory bowel disease in minority populations, intestinal permeability in Crohn’s disease families, and an active program of clinical trials with state-of-the-art immunomodulators and biologicals.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

CWRUmedicine’s Dr Sahil Parikh advises Men seeking ED drugs for heart checkups also

March 16, 2010

Men with heart disease who also have erectile dysfunction die sooner than men who do not seek treatment for impotence, researchers reported.

They found that men who had both conditions were twice as likely to die from any cause and twice as likely to have a heart attack than men with heart disease alone.

The researchers expressed concern that using drugs such as Pfizer’s (PFE.N) Viagra or Eli Lilly’s (LLY.N) Cialis to treat erectile dysfunction could mask the symptoms that point to widespread heart and artery disease and said men complaining of impotence should be checked by a cardiologist.

“It has long been known that erectile dysfunction is a marker for cardiovascular disease,” said Dr. Sahil Parikh at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

The first impotence drug, Pfizer’s Viagra, known generically as sildenafil, was at first developed to lower blood pressure, he said.

“They realized it had this other effect, which patients quite enjoyed,” Parikh said in a telephone interview.

HAPPY SIDE-EFFECT

Viagra and rival drugs such as Eli Lilly’s Cialis and Bayer AG’s BAYG.DE Levitra all work by increasing blood flow.

“In order to have proper erectile function, you have to have adequate blood flow to the genitals. If you have atherosclerosis, whether in the arteries on the neck, which can cause stroke, or the arteries of the heart, which can cause heart attack … it is the same disease.”

But while the erectile dysfunction drugs help blood flow all over the body, they do not treat the underlying hardening and narrowing in the arteries that is causing the problem.

“If patients have erectile dysfunction, we have to be very aggressive about screening and treating them for heart disease,” Parikh said.

To learn more visit CWRUmedicine.org

Case Western Reserve think beyond the possible

February 26, 2010

“Think beyond the possible” embodies the spirit of Case Western Reserve University.
From our faculty and students to our staff and alumni, new challenges are being met with innovative thinking and discovery that go beyond the status quo.
Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

CWRUmedicine Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

February 26, 2010

The Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, a premier center for comprehensive care of patients with diseases affecting the heart and vascular system, has a goal to create a national center of excellence in cardiovascular research and physician education, as well as patient care.
Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

UH System Achievement Award for Time-is-Muscle CWRUmedicine’s Cardiovascular Medicine Committee door-to-balloon time initiative

February 24, 2010

This is a multi-disciplinary team effort from EMS/Transfer Center, ED, cath lab, CICU, and Quality Center.

Median D2B reduced from 94 to 37 min with 100 per cent of pts receiving AHA/ACC recommended D2B less than 90 min.

Key Department of Medicine MDs included Madan Mohan, Rich Jospehson, Tom Lassar, Shyam Bhakta, Tom Carrigan, Marco Costa, and Dan Simon.

Learn more about Cardiovascular Medicine at CWRUmedicine