Posts Tagged ‘Sanford Markowitz’

Katie Couric visits Markowitz Lab

June 8, 2010

The day prior to Commencement, Katie Couric, CBS Evening News anchor and long time supporter of colon cancer research, visited Sanford “Sandy” Markowitz, MD, PhD, Ingalls Professor of Cancer Genetics, and Howard Hughes investigator, and his research team in his lab to gain a better understanding of the day-to-day research necessary for advancements in colon cancer.

Dr. Markowitz and his research team provided Couric a warm welcome, a tour of the lab, and hands-on experience and insight into the kind of research conducted inside the Markowitz lab. Couric and Dr. Markowitz have worked together for years in an effort to improve colon cancer screening and ultimately find a cure for the disease. Couric helped launch the National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance, a foundation that raises awareness and funding for colon cancer research, after her late husband, Jay Monahan, succumbed to the disease in 1998.

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Katie Couric Tours Case Western Reserve Research Lab

May 19, 2010

Katie Couric visited Sanford “Sandy” Markowitz, MD, PhD, professor and researcher of cancer and genetics, and his research team in his lab to gain a better understanding of the day-to-day research necessary for advancements in colon cancer.

The CBS Evening News with Katie Couric anchor and managing editor received a warm welcome from the researchers, who provided Couric with hands-on training. They also informed her of the various research projects being conducted in the Markowitz lab at Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine.

The touching visit brought together Couric and Markowitz, who have been working together for years to improve colon cancer screening, and ultimately the disease. Couric’s late husband, Jay Monahan, succumbed to the disease in 1998.

Couric went on to help co-found The Entertainment Industry Foundation’s National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance, which has raised awareness and funding for colon cancer research.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

New test developed by CWRUmedicine faculty to prevent colon cancer

March 8, 2010

A new test, added to the American Cancer Society guidelines, could make screening less troublesome for the nearly 50 percent of Americans 50 and older who aren’t being tested for colon cancer, the nation’s second leading cause of cancer death.

There’s a very clear problem,” says Sanford Markowitz, M.D., Ph.D., a Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine professor and attending physician at University Hospitals in Cleveland. “No one should die of colon cancer if it’s diagnosed in the early stages, but it becomes highly incurable if the cancer spreads beyond the colon.”

The new test, developed by a Markowitz-led team, looks for abnormal DNA in a patient’s stool to indicate colon cancer. The test, currently marketed as ColoSure and produced by Laboratory Corporation of America, retails for about $225.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

DNA Screening for Colon Cancer

March 7, 2010

It is estimated that colon cancer will kill 50,000 people in the United States this year. But found early, that number could be lowered substantially. So why do so many still die from it? The answer and the solution can be found in a medical laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio. Watch and learn as CWRUmedicine Hematology Oncology’s, Dr Sanford Markowitz speaks about this new breakthrough.
Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

New test developed by CWRUmedicine researchers may reduce colon cancer

March 7, 2010

Colon cancer is the second most deadly cancer in the U.S. despite being the most preventable. The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) recently announced concern that people will neglect colon cancer screening during this economic climate.

Screening is recommended in both sexes over age 50 and earlier if a patient has a family history of this disease. However, some people put it off due to fear of having a colonoscopy, which can be both invasive and expensive. As more people lose health insurance coverage, the high cost of this procedure may lead many more people to forego screening.

Sanford Markowitz, MD, CWRUmedicine oncologist and colon cancer researcher of the University Hospitals Ireland Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, has developed a less expensive, non-invasive test for this disease.

About the test:

  • The non-invasive test detects DNA markers for colon cancer using a stool sample that is taken at home
  • The DNA Stool Test is available now at the doctor’s office, or can be easily ordered by the doctor
  • Although the test isn’t covered by insurance, the cost is significantly lower
  • Patients with negative results will not need to commit time and money to having a colonoscopy; patients with positive results will move forward with  colonoscopy to provide more information
  • It is 80 percent effective and while colonoscopy is still the most effective test, it is not useful if patients are avoiding it altogether
  • The American Cancer Society added the test to its screening guidelines last year

Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org

DNA Screening for Colon Cancer Video

February 26, 2010

It is estimated that colon cancer will kill 50,000 people in the United States this year. But found early, that number could be lowered substantially. So why do so many still die from it? The answer and the solution can be found in a medical laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio.

A team of researchers led by Sanford Markowitz, M.D., Ph.D. at the Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine has found a way to detect colon cancer quickly and non-invasively.
Learn more at CWRUmedicine.org