Posts Tagged ‘uh cmc’

UH received Top Health System Award

June 24, 2010

University Hospitals named one of the Top 10 Health Systems in U.S.

For the second consecutive year, University Hospitals (UH) has been named one of the top 10 health systems in the United States based on clinical performance by Thomson Reuters, a leading business and professional information organization.

UH and the other top 10 systems outperformed their peers by a wide margin. They provided better care, followed standards of care more closely, saved more lives, had fewer patient complications, and made fewer patient safety errors.

The list was compiled in a study conducted by researchers from the Thomson Reuters 100 Top Hospitals®. They analyzed the quality and efficiency of 255 health systems based on eight metrics that gauge clinical quality and efficiency: mortality, medical complications, patient safety, average length of stay, 30-day mortality rate, 30-day readmission rate, adherence to clinical standards of care (evidence-based core measures published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services), and HCAHPS patient survey score (part of a national initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to measure the quality of care in hospitals).

Thomson Reuters rankings are available at


New Research on Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in their first complete remission

March 31, 2010

“Effect of Age on Outcome of Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First Complete Remission or With Myelodysplastic Syndrome”

McClune BL, Weisdorf DJ, Pedersen TL, da Silva GT, Tallman MS, Sierra J, Dipersio J, Keating A, Gale RP, George B, Gupta V, Hahn T, Isola L, Jagasia M, Lazarus H, Marks D, Maziarz R, Waller EK, Bredeson C, Giralt S.
J Clin Oncol. 2010 Mar 8

Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) primarily afflict older individuals. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is generally not offered because of concerns of excess morbidity and mortality. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens allow increased use of allogeneic HCT for older patients. To define prognostic factors impacting long-term outcomes of RIC regimens in patients older than age 40 years with AML in first complete remission or MDS and to determine the impact of age, we analyzed data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR).

We reviewed data reported to the CIBMTR (1995 to 2005) on 1,080 patients undergoing RIC HCT. Outcomes analyzed included neutrophil recovery, incidence of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS).

Univariate analyses demonstrated no age group differences in NRM, grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, or relapse. Patients age 40 to 54, 55 to 59, 60 to 64, and >/= 65 years had 2-year survival rates as follows: 44% (95% CI, 37% to 52%), 50% (95% CI, 41% to 59%), 34% (95% CI, 25% to 43%), and 36% (95% CI, 24% to 49%), respectively, for patients with AML (P = .06); and 42% (95% CI, 35% to 49%), 35% (95% CI, 27% to 43%), 45% (95% CI, 36% to 54%), and 38% (95% CI, 25% to 51%), respectively, for patients with MDS (P = .37). Multivariate analysis revealed no significant impact of age on NRM, relapse, DFS, or OS (all P > .3). Greater HLA disparity adversely affected 2-year NRM, DFS, and OS. Unfavorable cytogenetics adversely impacted relapse, DFS, and OS. Better pre-HCT performance status predicted improved 2-year OS. CONCLUSION: With these similar outcomes observed in older patients, we conclude that older age alone should not be considered a contraindication to HCT.

UH CMC is receives Thomson Reuters Top Hospitals Award AGAIN

March 29, 2010

Thomson Reuters today released its annual study identifying the 100 top U.S. hospitals based on their overall organizational performance.
Clinical arm of Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center has received the award two years in a row.

The Thomson Reuters 100 Top Hospitals(R):
National Benchmarks study evaluates performance in 10 areas: mortality, medical complications, patient safety, average length of stay, expenses, profitability, patient satisfaction, adherence to clinical standards of care, and post-discharge mortality and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The study has been conducted annually since 1993.

“This year’s study magnified the value that 100 Top Hospital award winners provide to their communities. Even during the economic downturn, the 100 Top Hospitals maintained a profit from operations while raising the bar for clinical quality and patient satisfaction,” said Jean Chenoweth, senior vice president for performance improvement and 100 Top Hospitals programs at Thomson Reuters. “The insistence of these hospitals’ leaders — their boards, executive teams and medical staffs — on overall excellence makes the difference.”

To conduct the 100 Top Hospitals study, Thomson Reuters researchers evaluated 2,926 short-term, acute care, non-federal hospitals. They used public information — Medicare cost reports, Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MedPAR) data, and core measures and patient satisfaction data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare data set.

Learn more at

Dr Afshin Dowlati discusses a new way to predict effectiveness of chemotherapy

March 1, 2010

Doctors often have trouble knowing who might respond to certain cancer treatments. “We kind of give chemotherapy and wish for a good result,” says Dr. Afshin Dowlati of CWRUmedicine’s Hematology Oncology. That could change. Dowlati led a study that revealed lung cancer patients with low levels of a molecule that controls cellular interaction have twice the chance of responding to chemotherapy than those with high levels. Those levels can also predict how likely a patient is to live a year after diagnosis. The difference could help patients decide whether to try chemotherapy, drugs or pursue alternative therapies, Dowlati says.

Read more at Cleveland Magazine ::

CWRUmedicine To Lead Hypertension Study

February 26, 2010

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is getting nearly 15 million dollars from the National Institutes of health to lead an important new study of hypertension.

Current guidelines recommend lowering hypertensive patients’ systolic blood pressure – that’s the first number in a blood pressure reading – to below 140 – 138 over 90, for example.  But physicians want to know if lowering that recommended systolic blood pressure to below 120 can further reduce the incidence of cardiovascular and kidney disease, or slow the decline of functional cognition.

Dr. Jackson Wright, who heads the Clinical Hypertension Program at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, says the medical school will be one of five U.S. institutions taking a leadership role in what’s called the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial – dubbed SPRINT.

Wright:  “The fact that Cleveland, Northeast Ohio and Central Ohio has a very diverse population makes this an outstanding location to conduct a study such as SPRINT.”

The study will take place over 9 years, and will involve 75 hundred patients.

Wright says it will measure the benefits of reducing systolic blood pressure against risks posed by increased medication and other factors in treatment of hypertension.

Learn more at

Download now or listen on posterous

1030hypertension.mp3 (396 KB)

DNA Screening for Colon Cancer Video

February 26, 2010

It is estimated that colon cancer will kill 50,000 people in the United States this year. But found early, that number could be lowered substantially. So why do so many still die from it? The answer and the solution can be found in a medical laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio.

A team of researchers led by Sanford Markowitz, M.D., Ph.D. at the Case Western Reserve University Department of Medicine has found a way to detect colon cancer quickly and non-invasively.
Learn more at

CWRUmedicine Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

February 26, 2010

The Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, a premier center for comprehensive care of patients with diseases affecting the heart and vascular system, has a goal to create a national center of excellence in cardiovascular research and physician education, as well as patient care.
Learn more at

HemOnc approach to cancer

February 24, 2010

Matthew Cooney, MD, discusses the multidisciplinary approach to cancer treatment at the Department of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University.
Learn more about the Division of Hematoloy Oncology ::

Cardiovascular Medicine Research Innovation Video

February 24, 2010

CWRUmedicine’s Cardiovascular Medicine’s Research & Innovation Center is the largest biomedical research center in the state of Ohio, and one of the top 15 in the country.

Our Cardiovascular Research Center works specifically to improve the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We use translational research (the clinical application of scientific medical research from lab to bedside) and advancements in biomedicine to improve industry standards and quality of patient care.

Learn more at CWRUmedicine Cardiovascular Medicine

UH System Achievement Award for Time-is-Muscle CWRUmedicine’s Cardiovascular Medicine Committee door-to-balloon time initiative

February 24, 2010

This is a multi-disciplinary team effort from EMS/Transfer Center, ED, cath lab, CICU, and Quality Center.

Median D2B reduced from 94 to 37 min with 100 per cent of pts receiving AHA/ACC recommended D2B less than 90 min.

Key Department of Medicine MDs included Madan Mohan, Rich Jospehson, Tom Lassar, Shyam Bhakta, Tom Carrigan, Marco Costa, and Dan Simon.

Learn more about Cardiovascular Medicine at CWRUmedicine