Posts Tagged ‘school of medicine’

hematology oncology publications :: Q2 | 2010

July 8, 2010

Inhibition of Lck enhances glucocorticoid sensitivity and apoptosis in lymphoid cell lines and in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Harr M, Caimi P, McColl K, Zhong F, Patel S, Barr P, Distelhorst C.
Cell Death Differ. 2010 Mar

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the elderly
Caimi PF, Barr PM, Berger NA, Lazarus HM.
Drugs Aging. 2010 Mar

Correlation between ZAP-70, phospho-ZAP-70, and phospho-Syk expression in leukemic cells from patients with CLL
Kaplan D, Meyerson HJ, Li X, Drasny C, Liu F, Costaldi M, Barr P, Lazarus HM.
Cytometry B Clin Cytom. 2010 Mar

Toxicity of sunitinib plus bevacizumab in renal cell carcinoma
Rini BI, Garcia JA, Cooney MM, Elson P, Tyler A, Beatty K, Bokar J, Ivy P, Chen HX, Dowlati A, Dreicer R.
J Clin Oncol. 2010 Jun

Variability of pulse oximetry measurement over 1 year in children with sickle cell disease depends on initial oxygen saturation measurement
Mullin JE, Cooper B, Seicean S, Strunk R, Rosen C, Redline S, Kemp J, DeBaun MR.
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2010 Jul

Inhibition of Lck enhances glucocorticoid sensitivity and apoptosis in lymphoid cell lines and in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Harr MW, Caimi P, McColl K, Zhong F, Patel S, Barr P, Distelhorst C.
Cell Death Differ. 2010 Mar

O-fucose modulates notch-controlled blood lineage commitment
Yan Q, Yao D, Wei LL, Huang Y, Myers J, Zhang L, Xin W, Shim J, Man Y, Petryniak B, Gerson S, Lowe JB, Zhou L.
Am J Pathol. 2010 Jun

Umbilical cord blood-selected CD133(+) cells exhibit vasculogenic functionality in vitro and in vivo
Finney MR, Fanning LR, Joseph ME, Goldberg JL, Greco NJ, Bhakta S, Winter DG, Forster M, Scheid PE, Sabe M, Pompili VJ, Laughlin MJ.
Cytotherapy. 2010

Correlation between ZAP-70, phospho-ZAP-70, and phospho-Syk expression in leukemic cells from patients with CLL
Kaplan D, Meyerson HJ, Li X, Drasny C, Liu F, Costaldi M, Barr P, Lazarus HM.
Cytometry B Clin Cytom. 2010 Mar

Astrocyte-restricted ablation of interleukin-17-induced Act1-mediated signaling ameliorates autoimmune encephalomyelitis
Kang Z, Altuntas CZ, Gulen MF, Liu C, Giltiay N, Qin H, Liu L, Qian W, Ransohoff RM, Bergmann C, Stohlman S, Tuohy VK, Li X.
Immunity. 2010 Mar

CXCR2-positive neutrophils are essential for cuprizone-induced demyelination: relevance to multiple sclerosis
Liu L, Belkadi A, Darnall L, Hu T, Drescher C, Cotleur AC, Padovani-Claudio D, He T, Choi K, Lane TE, Miller RH, Ransohoff RM.
Nat Neurosci. 2010 Mar

ARQ-197, an oral small-molecule inhibitor of c-Met for the treatment of solid tumors
Bagai R, Fan W, Ma PC.
IDrugs. 2010 Jun

A segregation analysis of Barrett’s esophagus and associated adenocarcinomas
Sun X, Elston R, Barnholtz-Sloan J, Falk G, Grady WM, Kinnard M, Mittal SK, Willis JE, Markowitz S, Brock W, Chak A.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Mar

Confirmation of Linkage to and Localization of Familial Colon Cancer Risk Haplotype on Chromosome 9q22
Gray-McGuire C, Guda K, Adrianto I, Lin CP, Natale L, Potter JD, Newcomb P, Poole EM, Ulrich CM, Lindor N, Goode EL, Fridley BL, Jenkins R, Le Marchand L, Casey G, Haile R, Hopper J, Jenkins M, Young J, Buchanan D, Gallinger S, Adams M, Lewis S, Willis J, Elston R, Markowitz SD, Wiesner GL.
Cancer Res. 2010 Jul

Malignant T cells in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma lesions contain decreased levels of the antiapoptotic protein Ku70
Ferenczi K, Ohtola J, Aubert P, Kessler M, Sugiyama H, Somani AK, Gilliam AC, Chen JZ, Yeh I, Matsuyama S, McCormick TS, Cooper KD.
Br J Dermatol. 2010 Apr

Securinine induces p73-dependent apoptosis preferentially in p53-deficient colon cancer cells
Rana S, Gupta K, Gomez J, Matsuyama S, Chakrabarti A, Agarwal ML, Agarwal A, Agarwal MK, Wald DN.
FASEB J. 2010 Jun

Factor XII stimulates ERK1/2 and Akt through uPAR, integrins, and the EGFR to initiate angiogenesis
LaRusch GA, Mahdi F, Shariat-Madar Z, Adams G, Sitrin RG, Zhang WM, McCrae KR, Schmaier AH.
Blood. 2010 Jun

Comorbidities, functional limitations, and geriatric syndromes in relation to treatment and survival patterns among elders with colorectal cancer
Koroukian SM, Xu F, Bakaki PM, Diaz-Insua M, Towe TP, Owusu C.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2010 Mar

Factor XII: what does it contribute to our understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of hemostasis & thrombosis
Stavrou E, Schmaier AH.
Thromb Res. 2010 Mar

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Much-needed complement to cholesterol testing

June 25, 2010

For patients outside the highest and lowest traditional risk factor categories, based on factors like high cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and family history of heart disease, MRP-8/14 could become a prominent diagnostic tool. “We are attempting to determine whether the use of MRP-8/14 should sway us toward more aggressive preventive therapies,” says Carl Orringer, MD, the HarringtonMcLaughlin Chair in Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the School of Medicine.

Currently, a “high-sensitivity C-reactive protein” (hs-CRP) assay is sometimes used in conjunction with cholesterol tests to assess heart disease risk. Like hs-CRP, MRP-8/14 represents a different biological process than cholesterol and is likely to serve as a complement to, not a substitute for, cholesterol screening. Of cholesterol testing’s shortcomings, Dr. Orringer says, “Relying on cholesterol alone is ignoring the inflammation that lights the fuse that sets off the explosion that is the heart ttack.”

Dr. Orringer, who developed an innovative heart attack risk assessment program that uses CT scans to see whether a person has hardening of the arteries, believes that MRP-8/14 may come to be incorporated to aid in risk estimation.

“A person’s heart attack risk is related to how much calcium is in the arteries—the more calcium, the greater the risk,” Dr. Orringer explains. “Those with calcium in their arteries indicating atherosclerosis might be really good candidates for MRP-8/14 evaluation to see who is at the highest risk.”

Director of Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine, Inaugural Robert S. and Sylvia K. Reitman Family Foundation Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Innovation

June 25, 2010

Pamela B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D., dean of the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, announced the appointment of Jonathan S. Stamler, M.D., as the director of the Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine and the first to hold the Robert S. and Sylvia K. Reitman Family Foundation Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Innovation at the Case Western Reserve University Cardiovascular Center and University Hospitals Harrington-McLaughlin Heart & Vascular Institute.

The newly established chair was made possible by a $1.5 million gift from the Reitman Family Foundation and was slated to be held by a preeminent physician scientist dedicated to advancing cardiovascular medicine through compassionate patient care, clinical research, and training of fellows and residents.

As director of the Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine, primarily based in the Department of Medicine, Stamler will be charged with developing the Institute, with purview across Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals. His efforts will catalyze scientific discoveries in molecular medicine, formulate new therapies that benefit humankind, and inspire the next generation of physician scientists.

His research specifically has led to elucidating the fundamental role of nitric oxide in control of complex physiological responses through S-nitrosylation, a protein modification that he discovered. His work has helped to transform the simple notion of cellular redox state into the concept of a dynamic and precisely regulated mechanism for control of protein function, analogous to phosphorylation, but operating through covalent modifications at cysteine thiols. The ramifications of his work extend to all major classes of proteins and accumulating evidence suggests that protein S-nitrosylation is aberrant in many diseases.

Stamler completed his undergraduate studies at Brandeis University, earned his medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and completed his medical residency and fellowship training in both cardiology and pulmonary medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He joined the faculty of Harvard Medical School as Assistant Professor of Medicine in October 1993. In December of 1993, Stamler joined the faculty of Duke University, where he is currently the George Barth Geller Professor of Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry.

Ohio Senate grants letter of commendation to School of Medicine

June 8, 2010

The members of the Senate of the 128th General Assembly of Ohio paid tribute the School of Medicine in an official letter of commendation for being ranked as the 20th best medical school in research in the nation, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

The letter praised our institution, “known for its dedication to medical research, and the world of its highly qualified and committed staff has earned the university an exceptional reputation.”

Signed by Senator Bill Harris, President of the Ohio Senate, and Senator Shirley A. Smith, Assistant Minority Leader, the acknowledgement applauds the School’s innumerable contributions to the study of medicine.

Ohio Third Frontier approves biomedical project, investing grants

May 27, 2010

The Ohio Third Frontier Commission on Wednesday approved $20 million in Wright Project grants, including nearly $9 million for three biomedical projects.

During their first meeting since voters approved an extension and expansion of the Ohio Third Frontier through fiscal 2015, commissioners also approved $11 million in entrepreneurial support and pre-seed investment fund grants, as well as a fiscal 2011 budget between $125 million and $143 million.

Third Frontier is the 10-year, $1.35 billion program to re-energize Ohio’s economy by investing in projects in five industry clusters, including biomedical. Early this month, voters added $700 million in bond proceeds and four years to the program.

The five commissioners who attended Wednesday’s meeting voted unanimously to fund seven Wright Project grant proposals, including:
Cleveland Clinic: $3 million for its Clinically Applied Rehabilitation Engineering project, which aims at developing, testing, manufacturing and commercializing advanced, rehabilitative medical products for patients suffering from cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, metabolic and musculoskeletal diseases. Collaborators: Parker Hannifin Corp., Bertec Corp., Case Western Reserve University and the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center.

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland: $2.1 million for its Development of a Quantitative Analysis System for Stem Cells project, which focuses on research commercialization of non-embryonic stem cells from umbilical cord blood as part of a Food and Drug Administration-licensed therapy to help some transplant patients and for testing. Collaborators: Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cleveland Cord Blood Center, BioInVision, Athersys (NASDAQ: ATHX), PerkinElmer, Thermogenesis (NASDAQ: KOOL), GE Healthcare (NYSE: GE), Hospira and Lakeland Community College.

University of Cincinnati: $3 million for its project, The Ohio Center for Microfluidic Innovation — New Products and Competitive Manufacturing of Emerging Biomedical Applications. The project wants to study, make and commercialize microfluidics technology, which could generate more valuable test results from a much smaller fluid sample than current technology. National Academies reviewers suggested the project be scaled back to just its biomedical applications. Collaborators: Siloam Biosciences, Gamma Dynamics, Sun Chemical and EnMonT.

Third Frontier advisers and commissioners spent a lot of time Wednesday debating “continuity” issues among entrepreneurial support and pre-seed investment funds that already have received grants. Facing state budget challenges, the program limited awards to only organizations that have received past money:

Cleveland Clinic was awarded $2 million for its Ohio BioValidation Fund III, which will invest in promising early stage biomedical companies.

JumpStart Inc., the venture development organization in Cleveland that has invested in several biomedical and healthcare companies, will receive $4 million for operations and investments. JumpStart gets an additional $1.8 million for its bioscience and entrepreneurial network, which will provide entrepreneurial services to bioscience start-ups in the Northeast Ohio region. Collaborators: BioEnterprise, Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise and the Akron Global Business Accelerator.

North Coast Angel Fund II in Mayfield Heights is getting $2 million to invest in high-potential, early stage technology companies.

Ohio TechAngel Fund III in Columbus was awarded $825,000 to invest in early stage Ohio-based technology companies, with a strong emphasis on healthcare innovations and information technology.

TechColumbus is getting $500,000 to continue investing in early-to-late-stage technologystart-ups in Central Ohio. Focus areas of the fund are bioscience, information technology and advanced materials.

Third Frontier commissioners put off votes on three more entrepreneurial support and pre-seed fund grant proposals, asking for more information with plans to vote on those proposals in June.

As for next year’s fiscal budget, the commissioners plan to award $20 million to entrepreneurial support and pre-seed funds, as well as $7 million to both biomedical and medical imaging grant-seekers. The commissioners also budgeted $8 million for a new Wright Center Success Fund, which will invest operating dollars in existing centers of innovation.